Species

Papilio (Menelaides) memnon Linnaeus, 1758

    agenor Linnaeus, 1758

Original Description

Papilio (Eques) agenor Linnaeus, 1758

Type specimen(s)

Status: Lectotype
Specimen data: LT (♀)
Additional information: "1♀ labelled "13. Agenor" [by Linnaeus], "Agenor 747" [by Smith] on a black sewing needle [typical of Osbeck specimens], here designated as LECTOTYPE" (Honey & Scoble 2001: 293)
Current depository: LSLO, London

Type locality

Type locality as cited in original description: "Asia"
Current country: China

Taxonomic history

Originally described as Papilio (Eques) agenor Linnaeus, 1758
Treated as a synonym of Papilio memnon Linn. by Boisduval (1836: 192), and by Gray (1853: 13). Treated as a species of Papilio Linn., 1767 by Kirby (1871: 552).

Remarks

Lectotype designated by Honey & Scoble (2001: 293). "Linnaean material examined LSL: 1[f] labelled "13. Agenor" [by Linnaeus], "Agenor 747" [by Smith] on a black sewing needle [typical of Osbeck specimens], here designated as LECTOTYPE [see Remarks]; 1[f] labelled "no label" [by Tams]; 1[f] labelled "Agenor" [by Linnaeus], "Achates Fab. 4.9" [by Smith]. MLU: 1[f] labelled "Agenor" [by Aurivillius] on a black-edged label, [drawer labelled] "Agenor, Mus. Gust. Adolph." [by Thunberg], "Papilio Agenor f. typica [f], sec. Auriv." [by Aurivillius] on a red-edged label, "Uppsala Univ. Zool. Mus., Linnésamlingen nr. 1881, Papilio agenor". Subsequent material examined LSL: 1[f] labelled "Marsham 1797" [by Smith]; 1[f] labelled "China, M. of Rock[ingha]m.". Remarks. In 1764 Linnaeus gave the additional locality "China" and in 1767 he only listed "China". The species was listed as having been obtained in the vicinity of Canton by Osbeck (1765). In the LSL there are two specimens labelled by Linnaeus. The one labelled "13. Agenor", which fits the original description in that it is without tails and has white in the discal cell of the hindwing, has been selected as lectotype. It was also considered by Corbet (1949: 194) to be the type and matches the upper specimen figured by Clerck." (Honey & Scoble 2001: 293)